A Rare Find: Passport Applications of Free Blacks

Today's post was written by Rebecca Sharp, Archives Specialist at the National Archives in Washington, DC. Several years ago, I received a telephone call from a researcher that turned out to be an extremely intriguing and challenging question.  The researcher wanted to know if there might be additional documentation relating to the passport application of … Continue reading A Rare Find: Passport Applications of Free Blacks

Slaves in the Family and Escape on the Pearl: A Report on Two Books that Used NARA Records

Today's post was written by Damani Davis, an Archivist at the National Archives in Washington, DC. Among the most tangible products validating the work of National Archives' (NARA) reference staff are the books written by the many researchers we’ve assisted over the years. Often, there can be a type of synergistic or mutually beneficial relationship … Continue reading Slaves in the Family and Escape on the Pearl: A Report on Two Books that Used NARA Records

Freedom Summer, 56 Years Later

Today's post was written by Daniella Furman, an Archivist in Research Services at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland. When I started researching the 1964 Freedom Summer Movement a few weeks ago, I thought it would be an interesting project to expand my knowledge about that important moment in history 56 years ago. Never … Continue reading Freedom Summer, 56 Years Later

Early Civil Rights Protest and the Steamer Sue Case

Today's post is written by Dr. Dennis Patrick Halpin, an Assistant Professor at Virginia Tech whose research examines how race, class, and gender shaped the 19th and 20th century urban experience in the United States. He's been conducting research at the National Archives at Philadelphia, focused primarily on the records of the United States District Court … Continue reading Early Civil Rights Protest and the Steamer Sue Case

Bayard Rustin: The Inmate that the Prison Could Not Handle

Today's post was written by Shaina Destine, a student intern in Textual Processing at the National Archives in College Park. Bayard Rustin was the perpetual hero that history forgot.  I learned of Bayard Rustin in regards to his Civil Rights and Gay Rights work in my early 20s.  I heard about him being a Quaker … Continue reading Bayard Rustin: The Inmate that the Prison Could Not Handle

Black History Month Tribute: Dr. Walter B. Hill Jr., Archivist, Historian, and Father

Today’s Black History Tribute was written by Alexis Hill, Assistant Registrar in the Exhibits Division at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland Dr. Walter B. Hill Jr., scholar, historian, and senior archivist, opened a lot of doors to the records on African-American history during his 30-year career at the National Archives and Records Administration … Continue reading Black History Month Tribute: Dr. Walter B. Hill Jr., Archivist, Historian, and Father

Freedmen’s Bureau Transportation Records: Letters of “Sold” Former Slaves Seeking to Rejoin Loved Ones

Today's blog was written by Mr. Damani Davis, Reference Archivist at the National Archives in Washington, D. C. This blog was a part of a presentation titled "The Freedmen's Bureau and the Freedman's Bank: Reconstruction Records at the National Archives," given at the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) Conference … Continue reading Freedmen’s Bureau Transportation Records: Letters of “Sold” Former Slaves Seeking to Rejoin Loved Ones

Sold for the Benefit of the Captors

Today’s blog was written by genealogist Renée K. Carl   As a genealogist with a background in cultural anthropology, I relish the research project that allows me to put information about a family into the context of the times. When a genealogist in Canada put out a call for assistance on a project regarding his ancestor’s … Continue reading Sold for the Benefit of the Captors

Freedmen’s Bureau Transportation Records: Letters of “Sold” Former Slaves Seeking to Rejoin Loved Ones

Written by Damani Davis, Reference Archivist at the National Archives in Washington, D. C. Due to the recent popularity of genealogy-based television series such as, African American Lives, Who Do You Think You Are, and Faces of America, the interest in genealogical research has grown rapidly among African Americans. Reference archivists and specialists at the … Continue reading Freedmen’s Bureau Transportation Records: Letters of “Sold” Former Slaves Seeking to Rejoin Loved Ones

NARA at ASALH

written by Dr. Tina L. Ligon, Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland   For many years, employees at the National Archives have participated in the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) annual conferences. They've shared information on records relating to the black experience that can be found … Continue reading NARA at ASALH