3/4 quarter portrait of Nana in button down shirt

It’s All Relative: Locating Family in Federal Records and Genealogy Research Strategies

This blog is part of the #1950CensusCountdown. The 1950 Census will be released by the National Archives on April 1, 2022. The genealogy bug bit me about a decade ago while briefly cross-training with the Archives unit formerly known as the Research Support Services Branch at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. This branch had … Continue reading It’s All Relative: Locating Family in Federal Records and Genealogy Research Strategies

Experiencing Black Joy through Federal Records

Joy is defined as an emotion of great delight or happiness that is often caused by a positive or an extraordinary experience. Joy can be good for one’s health and wellness. Scientists and psychologists have studied the effects of joy on people, and determined that joy can prevent stress, improve heart health, reduce pain, and … Continue reading Experiencing Black Joy through Federal Records

Cole wearing a nurse hat, dark cape, and nurse uniform

A Woman to Know: Aileen Bertha Stewart

Today's post was written by Holly Rivet, archival technician at the National Archives in St. Louis. Aileen Bertha Stewart, c. 1918 (NAID 2662312) In 1917, the United States formally entered the First World War.  Medical professionals registered for military service and volunteered to meet the needs of wartime healthcare systems.  More than 100 Black doctors … Continue reading A Woman to Know: Aileen Bertha Stewart

Morton and President Carter shaking hands and smiling

Azie Taylor Morton: The One and Only

Since the dissolvement of the Freedman’s Bank, the peculiar history of financial institutions and the African American community has been woven into America’s cultural fabric.  This is why the appointment of Azie Taylor Morton to President Jimmy Carter’s administration was, and still is revolutionary.  On September 12,1977, President Carter appointed Azie Taylor Morton Treasurer of … Continue reading Azie Taylor Morton: The One and Only

Rediscovering Black History Top 5 Posts of 2021

These were the most viewed posts of 2021! Thanks so much for reading Rediscovering Black History, we look forward to bringing you more stories from the National Archives relating to Black history in 2022! #6 Before Kamala - Black Women in Presidential Administrations Black women who have served in Presidential administrations. Marking the occasion of … Continue reading Rediscovering Black History Top 5 Posts of 2021

Baker speaking at a microphone

An American Original Inducted into the French Pantheon – Josephine Baker

Today's post was written by Netisha Currie, archives specialist at the National Archives at College Park. On November 30, 2021, Josephine Baker was bestowed the honor of Panthéonisation - being inducted into the national mausoleum of heroes at the French Pantheon. She is the first entertainer, Black woman, American, and only the sixth woman to … Continue reading An American Original Inducted into the French Pantheon – Josephine Baker

2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 4

We are now at the close of Black History Month 2021! This year, the Say it Loud! Employee Affinity Group is hosting a Black History Basic Training (inspired by GirlTrek campaigns from the past year), where we highlight individuals, organizations and events that made significant contributions to the African American experience. This week, we celebrated Soul City, … Continue reading 2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 4

“An Inspiration Throughout the World”: President Carter Presents Living Legacy Awards

Today's blog post was written by Daria Labinsky, Archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library.  When you work in an archives, you frequently discover amazing events that make you wish for a time machine (and a guest pass). One such event took place at the White House on February 23, 1979, when President Jimmy and … Continue reading “An Inspiration Throughout the World”: President Carter Presents Living Legacy Awards

The Honorable Agitator

Today's post was written by Daniella Furman, archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD Ida Bell Wells-Barnett was born into slavery on July 16, 1862, and freed by the Emancipation Proclamation. She held a career as an educator and later a journalist chronicling the African American experience in the early 1800’s. Her work … Continue reading The Honorable Agitator

2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 1

Ase. We have come to a close of the first week of Black History Month 2021. This year, the Say it Loud! Employee Affinity Group is hosting a Black History Basic Training (inspired by GirlTrek campaigns from the past year), where we highlight individuals, organizations and events that made significant contributions to the African American … Continue reading 2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 1