front view of 1 story school bldg w/bell on top

Westerly Winds and Big Skies, Finding Colonel Allen Allensworth at the National Archives

Today's post was written by Holly Rivet, archival technician at the National Archives in St. Louis. Allen Allensworth, nd (from findagrave) Allensworth, California was the first city to be established as an African American enclave in California.  It was officially founded on August 3, 1908 by Colonel Allen Allensworth, Chaplain to the 24th Infantry, a … Continue reading Westerly Winds and Big Skies, Finding Colonel Allen Allensworth at the National Archives

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Juneteenth: The Celebration of a New Freedom in America

Today's post was written by Billy R. Glasco, Jr., archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum. To understand Juneteenth’s significance, one must understand how geography, military occupation, timing, and the resilience of a proud people solidified June 19, 1865 as the date that symbolizes freedom for African Americans. The National Archives is the … Continue reading Juneteenth: The Celebration of a New Freedom in America

facade of Churh showing bell tower and entrance

Richard Allen and the Origins of the AME Church

Today's post was written by Holly Rivet, archival technician at the National Archives in St. Louis. Richard Allen was born February 14, 1760, enslaved to Benjamin Chew, a Quaker lawyer in Philadelphia.  As a child, he was sold to Stokley Sturgis, a plantation owner in Dover, DE where Allen taught himself to read and write.  … Continue reading Richard Allen and the Origins of the AME Church

view of exit ramp showing Alex Haley museum sign

From Structure to Literature: The National Parks Register of Historic Places that Gave Voice to the Black Experience

Today's post was written by Holly Rivet, archival technician at the National Archives in St. Louis. The National Archives Catalog now includes digital scans of the applications for places that have been considered for National Historic Places and Landmarks status.  National Register of Historic Places and National Historic Landmarks Program Records, 2013 – 2017 (NAID … Continue reading From Structure to Literature: The National Parks Register of Historic Places that Gave Voice to the Black Experience

view of ballpark ca. 1938 w/marked segregated areas

The First Time Jackie Robinson Broke Baseball’s Color Barrier

Today's post was written by Bob Nowatzki, Archives Technician in Research Services at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland. For good reason, Jackie Robinson’s debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947 at Ebbets Field is seen by many as a major event in the history of U.S. civil rights as well as … Continue reading The First Time Jackie Robinson Broke Baseball’s Color Barrier

A Community Enterprise: The Rosenwald Schools of the National Register for Historic Places

Today's post was written by Alicia Henneberry, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at College Park, MD The Longstreet Rosenwald School, circa 2009 (NAID 73973387) Pictured above is the Longstreet School, a small, quaint structure sitting quietly off Louisiana Route 5 in DeSoto Parish, Louisiana. Despite its perfectly ordinary and unassuming appearance, this building represented … Continue reading A Community Enterprise: The Rosenwald Schools of the National Register for Historic Places

Not Just a Harlem Thing

Today's post was written by Joshua Cain, Archives Technician at the National Archives in College Park, MD In the 1920s, the neighborhood of Harlem in Manhattan was the epicenter for a new movement that empowered African Americans to express themselves and their experiences in various facets of the arts. New poems, books, paintings, and literature … Continue reading Not Just a Harlem Thing