Happy Birthday Langston Hughes!

What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up       like a raisin in the sun?       Or fester like a sore—       And then run?       Does it stink like rotten meat?       Or crust and sugar over—       like a syrupy sweet?       Maybe it just sags       like a heavy load.       Or does it explode? ~"Harlem" by Langston Hughes … Continue reading Happy Birthday Langston Hughes!

circular white label with photo of Black woman with long straightened hair in the center

“No Lye,” the FDA Inspection of G.T. Young, Inc.

Today’s post comes from Zoë A. Zaharakis, a history education undergraduate student at Temple University, with the help of Archivist Grace Schultz. Zoë interned with the National Archives at Philadelphia virtually this fall as a part of the Cultural Fieldwork Initiative (CFI), a partnership with the Temple University College of Education Social Studies faculty and … Continue reading “No Lye,” the FDA Inspection of G.T. Young, Inc.

Portal Spotlight: Migrations and the Black Experience

Today's post was written by Netisha Currie, archives specialist at the National Archives at College Park. The latest Black History portal at the National Archives delves into a huge part of the American experience - the freedom of movement. Considering many people of African descent were forcibly brought to and moved throughout the United States, … Continue reading Portal Spotlight: Migrations and the Black Experience

Portal Spotlight: World War I

In 1917, when the United States declared war on Germany and entered the Great War, African Americans were supportive. The patriotic spirit of the era encouraged Black men and women to enlist in the military, in order to fight for freedom and democracy. Although their patriotism was just as great as their white American counterparts, … Continue reading Portal Spotlight: World War I

Dr. George Edmund Haynes: Social Crusader in Black Economics

Today's post was written by Gabrielle Hutchins, Ph.D, an archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD George Edmund Haynes Dr. George Edmund Haynes is one of many remarkable figures in the history of the African American labor movement.  During the 1920s, Dr. Haynes truthfully captured Black laborers' stories as he traveled throughout the … Continue reading Dr. George Edmund Haynes: Social Crusader in Black Economics

“WE WORK AGAIN:” African Americans and the Federal Work Programs during the Great Depression

Today’s blog was written by Kevin L. Bradley, Archives Technician in the Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Division at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland   The economic hardship of the Great Depression affected everybody, but it was especially harsh for African Americans who were already suffering from unfair employment, housing, and educational practices. … Continue reading “WE WORK AGAIN:” African Americans and the Federal Work Programs during the Great Depression