Bruce Boynton: The Original Freedom Rider

Today's post was written by Billy R. Glasco, Jr., archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum. On December 20, 1958, Bruce Carver Boynton, a black law student at Howard University was on his way home to Selma, Alabama via Trailways bus line for the Christmas Holidays.  On his way home, Boynton bus stopped … Continue reading Bruce Boynton: The Original Freedom Rider

Louis E. Martin: The Godfather of Black Politics

Today's post was written by Billy R. Glasco, Jr., archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum Louis E. Martin, Assistant to President Jimmy Carter (NAID 181236) On his 108th birthday, The Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum highlights the life of African American journalist and political activist, Louis E. Martin. Although inconspicuous, Martin’s contributions … Continue reading Louis E. Martin: The Godfather of Black Politics

Aerial Photograph of the March Reaching the Capitol Building

Selma: The Marches that Changed America

Today's post was written by Billy R. Glasco, Jr., archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library & Museum The Selma Marches were a series of three marches that took place in 1965 between Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. These marches were organized to protest the blocking of Black Americans' right to vote by the systematic racist structure of … Continue reading Selma: The Marches that Changed America

Gwen Ifill, “A Journalist’s Journalist”

Today's Tribute was written by Dr. Tina L. Ligon, Supervisory Archivist at the National Archives at College Park “Journalists are accused of being lapdogs when they don’t ask the hard questions, but then accused of being rude when they do. Good thing we have tough hides.” ~ Gwen Ifill On November 14, 2016, Gwen Ifill … Continue reading Gwen Ifill, “A Journalist’s Journalist”