Young w/hand on Bible standing in front of Thurgood Marshall, with President Carter in background

Andrew Young: A Giant Among Us

Today's post was written by Billy R. Glasco, Jr., archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum. Andrew Young, a Democratic Congressman from Georgia, three-quarter length portrait, seated, facing left, May 6, 1976 (Library of Congress) March 12, 2021 marked the 89th birthday of a leader that serves as a gatekeeper to our understanding … Continue reading Andrew Young: A Giant Among Us

2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 1

Ase. We have come to a close of the first week of Black History Month 2021. This year, the Say it Loud! Employee Affinity Group is hosting a Black History Basic Training (inspired by GirlTrek campaigns from the past year), where we highlight individuals, organizations and events that made significant contributions to the African American … Continue reading 2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 1

After the 19th Amendment: Women in the US Virgin Islands Secure the Vote

Today’s post was written by Jennifer Johnson, curator for Museum Programs at the National Archives in Kansas City. When the People of the United States adopted the Nineteenth Amendment and declared that neither the United States nor any State can deny or abridge the right to vote on account of sex, they clearly established as a … Continue reading After the 19th Amendment: Women in the US Virgin Islands Secure the Vote

Aerial Photograph of the March Reaching the Capitol Building

Selma: The Marches that Changed America

Today's post was written by Billy R. Glasco, Jr., archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library & Museum The Selma Marches were a series of three marches that took place in 1965 between Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. These marches were organized to protest the blocking of Black Americans' right to vote by the systematic racist structure of … Continue reading Selma: The Marches that Changed America

Portal Spotlight: Voting Rights

Today's post was written by Joshua Schroeder, archives technician at the National Archives in College Park. The National Archives latest Black History portal delves into one of the most important threads of American history: securing the right to vote. Suffrage for Black Americans remains an important aspect of American history because voting is an essential … Continue reading Portal Spotlight: Voting Rights

In the Long Tradition of Civil Rights: Tribute to C. T. Vivian and John Lewis

“It’s about life, and who you are as a human being. Today is a sad day in that we lost two of the most powerful activists we’ve ever had – C.T. Vivian and John Lewis. The impact they had on America is unbelievable…” ~Chris Paul On July 17, 2020, two icons of the Civil Rights … Continue reading In the Long Tradition of Civil Rights: Tribute to C. T. Vivian and John Lewis

Freedom Summer, 56 Years Later

Today's post was written by Daniella Furman, an Archivist in Research Services at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland. When I started researching the 1964 Freedom Summer Movement a few weeks ago, I thought it would be an interesting project to expand my knowledge about that important moment in history 56 years ago. Never … Continue reading Freedom Summer, 56 Years Later

Black History Month 2017: Blogs Related to the Civil Rights Movement

Happy Black History Month! This year the Rediscovering Black History blog at the National Archives would like to highlight select posts from the past. This public blog was created to inform researchers, scholars, students, and anyone interested in records related to African-American history at the National Archives and Presidential Libraries on the vast amount of … Continue reading Black History Month 2017: Blogs Related to the Civil Rights Movement

Voting Rights in the Early 1960s: “Registering Who They Wanted To”

Today’s blog was written by Stacey Chandler, Textual Reference Archivist at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library Part II: Literacy Tests, Poll Taxes, and other 1971(a) Barriers to the Black Vote In 1962, Deputy Attorney General Burke Marshall reported that “racial denials of the right to vote” existed in eight states, with only fourteen percent of … Continue reading Voting Rights in the Early 1960s: “Registering Who They Wanted To”

“Turn this Town Out”: Stokely Carmichael, Black Power, and the March against Fear

Today’s blog was written by Dr. Tina L. Ligon, Supervisory Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland The March against Fear that took place in June 1966, is considered the last great march against racism of the 1960s Civil Rights era in the South. Participants of this march included the Southern Christian Leadership … Continue reading “Turn this Town Out”: Stokely Carmichael, Black Power, and the March against Fear