front view of 1 story school bldg w/bell on top

Westerly Winds and Big Skies, Finding Colonel Allen Allensworth at the National Archives

Today's post was written by Holly Rivet, archival technician at the National Archives in St. Louis. Allen Allensworth, nd (from findagrave) Allensworth, California was the first city to be established as an African American enclave in California.  It was officially founded on August 3, 1908 by Colonel Allen Allensworth, Chaplain to the 24th Infantry, a … Continue reading Westerly Winds and Big Skies, Finding Colonel Allen Allensworth at the National Archives

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Juneteenth: The Celebration of a New Freedom in America

Today's post was written by Billy R. Glasco, Jr., archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum. To understand Juneteenth’s significance, one must understand how geography, military occupation, timing, and the resilience of a proud people solidified June 19, 1865 as the date that symbolizes freedom for African Americans. The National Archives is the … Continue reading Juneteenth: The Celebration of a New Freedom in America

Larry Doby: A Life of Firsts and Seconds

Today's post was written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, senior archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD A little over two years ago in 2018 Congress, by Public Law No: 115-322 (132 STAT. 4440-4442) enacted the  Larry Doby Congressional Gold Medal Act. Upon hearing about this, I thought about getting Larry Doby’s autograph at … Continue reading Larry Doby: A Life of Firsts and Seconds

2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 3

We have come to a close of the third week of Black History Month 2021. This year, the Say it Loud! Employee Affinity Group is hosting a Black History Basic Training (inspired by GirlTrek campaigns from the past year), where we highlight individuals, organizations and events that made significant contributions to the African American experience. This week, … Continue reading 2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 3

2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 2

We have come to a close of the second week of Black History Month 2021. This year, the Say it Loud! Employee Affinity Group is hosting a Black History Basic Training (inspired by GirlTrek campaigns from the past year), where we highlight individuals, organizations and events that made significant contributions to the African American experience. This week, … Continue reading 2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 2

Mustering Out: the Navy’s First Black Yeowomen

Today's post was written by Cara Moore Lebonick, reference archives specialist at the National Archives at St. Louis Disclaimer: Some of the partial records featured contain language that does not reflect modern accepted terminology. Please keep this possible sensitive language in mind when reviewing the records. Orders for Fannie Foote Y3c The United States entered … Continue reading Mustering Out: the Navy’s First Black Yeowomen

The Maker of Pilots: Aviator and Civil Rights Activist Willa Beatrice Brown

Today's post was written by Jennifer Johnson, curator for the National Archives Traveling Exhibits Service at the National Archives in Kansas City. This blog previously appeared on Pieces of History. Willa Beatrice Brown is featured in the nationwide traveling exhibit One Half of the People: Advancing Equality for Women. Perhaps one of the less recognizable names, but … Continue reading The Maker of Pilots: Aviator and Civil Rights Activist Willa Beatrice Brown

Who Is He? A Long-Delayed Search for the Identity of the Airman Portrayed in a World War II Poster

Barbara Lewis Burger, who retired from the Still Picture Branch of the National Archives as a Senior Archivist, wrote today’s blog.  One of her areas of interest is photographic and graphic records of and about African Americans. "Keep us flying! Buy War Bonds." (NAID 514823) Almost 30 years ago I submitted a proposal to National … Continue reading Who Is He? A Long-Delayed Search for the Identity of the Airman Portrayed in a World War II Poster

An Uncensored Digital History of the Black GI in World War II

Today's post is written by Edward J.K. Gitre, Ph.D, Assistant Professor of History at Virginia Tech and Director of The American Soldier in World War II Project. "Colored soldiers is not treated worth a dam [sic] in Louisiana. They don't have no rights and no say-so!... One of us colored soldiers got on the city … Continue reading An Uncensored Digital History of the Black GI in World War II

“And They Thought We Couldn’t Fight:”* Remembering the Nine Soldiers in a World War I Photograph

Today’s Blog is written by Barbara Lewis Burger, a retired National Archives Still Picture Senior Archivist The above photograph of nine World War I soldiers of the 369th Infantry Regiment is one of several iconic photographs in the National Archives and Records Administration that document African American soldiers during the war. This particular image has been … Continue reading “And They Thought We Couldn’t Fight:”* Remembering the Nine Soldiers in a World War I Photograph