headshot of Ben Reeves wearing a cowboy hat and collared shirt, front and profile

Love and Death on the Frontier – Finding Ben Reeves at the National Archives

Today's post was written by Holly Rivet, archival technician at the National Archives in St. Louis. Mugshot of Ben Reeves from his Inmate Case File from Leavenworth Penitentiary (NAID 7861497, image 54) In the early afternoon of June 7, 1902, a young Ben Reeves paid a visit to his estranged wife, Castella Brown, at her … Continue reading Love and Death on the Frontier – Finding Ben Reeves at the National Archives

collage of various letterhead

Emmett J. Scott and Community Insights in the OPFs

Today’s post is by Cara Moore Lebonick, Archives Reference Specialist at the National Archives at St. Louis. Personnel records are lauded for their genealogical richness. They typically contain full names, maiden names, birthdates, death dates, next of kin, and even sometimes relevant children’s information, medical data, and photographs. The records offer insight into the working … Continue reading Emmett J. Scott and Community Insights in the OPFs

The Honorable Agitator

Today's post was written by Daniella Furman, archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD Ida Bell Wells-Barnett was born into slavery on July 16, 1862, and freed by the Emancipation Proclamation. She held a career as an educator and later a journalist chronicling the African American experience in the early 1800’s. Her work … Continue reading The Honorable Agitator

2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 2

We have come to a close of the second week of Black History Month 2021. This year, the Say it Loud! Employee Affinity Group is hosting a Black History Basic Training (inspired by GirlTrek campaigns from the past year), where we highlight individuals, organizations and events that made significant contributions to the African American experience. This week, … Continue reading 2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 2

Mustering Out: the Navy’s First Black Yeowomen

Today's post was written by Cara Moore Lebonick, reference archives specialist at the National Archives at St. Louis Disclaimer: Some of the partial records featured contain language that does not reflect modern accepted terminology. Please keep this possible sensitive language in mind when reviewing the records. Orders for Fannie Foote Y3c The United States entered … Continue reading Mustering Out: the Navy’s First Black Yeowomen

Portal Spotlight: World War I

In 1917, when the United States declared war on Germany and entered the Great War, African Americans were supportive. The patriotic spirit of the era encouraged Black men and women to enlist in the military, in order to fight for freedom and democracy. Although their patriotism was just as great as their white American counterparts, … Continue reading Portal Spotlight: World War I

Not Just a Harlem Thing

Today's post was written by Joshua Cain, Archives Technician at the National Archives in College Park, MD In the 1920s, the neighborhood of Harlem in Manhattan was the epicenter for a new movement that empowered African Americans to express themselves and their experiences in various facets of the arts. New poems, books, paintings, and literature … Continue reading Not Just a Harlem Thing

Dr. George Edmund Haynes: Social Crusader in Black Economics

Today's post was written by Gabrielle Hutchins, Ph.D, an archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD George Edmund Haynes Dr. George Edmund Haynes is one of many remarkable figures in the history of the African American labor movement.  During the 1920s, Dr. Haynes truthfully captured Black laborers' stories as he traveled throughout the … Continue reading Dr. George Edmund Haynes: Social Crusader in Black Economics

“We Remember Our Heroes”: Henry Johnson

Written by Michael Hancock Like hundreds of thousands of young American men, Henry Johnson returned from the First World War and tried to make a life for himself in spite of what he had experienced on the battlefields of Europe. Escaping with bullet and shrapnel wounds in the dozens, he was fortunate that he even … Continue reading “We Remember Our Heroes”: Henry Johnson

“And They Thought We Couldn’t Fight:”* Remembering the Nine Soldiers in a World War I Photograph

Today’s Blog is written by Barbara Lewis Burger, a retired National Archives Still Picture Senior Archivist The above photograph of nine World War I soldiers of the 369th Infantry Regiment is one of several iconic photographs in the National Archives and Records Administration that document African American soldiers during the war. This particular image has been … Continue reading “And They Thought We Couldn’t Fight:”* Remembering the Nine Soldiers in a World War I Photograph