Ward standing, in military uniform

The Trials and Triumphs of Dr. Joseph H. Ward

Today's post was written by David R. Hardin, archivist at the National Archives at St. Louis Veteran's Administration Hospital, Tuskegee, AL (NAID 102252457) On February 12th, 1923, Veteran’s Hospital #91 opened in Tuskegee, Alabama. Initially the hospital’s focus was treating service-related respiratory and mental health issues of African American veterans. However, the hospital would grow … Continue reading The Trials and Triumphs of Dr. Joseph H. Ward

military band w/their instruments and Reese standing at the side, on the deck of a ship

James Reese Europe: America’s Jazz Ambassador

First Lieutenant James R. Europe and the 369th Infantry Regiment Band playing for patients in the American Red Cross Hospital No. 9, Paris, France, September 4, 1918. (NAID: 55200536 Local Identifier: 111-SC-20417) The musical career of American jazz bandleader, composer, and arranger James Reese Europe (1881-1919) was as influential and unique as it was tragically … Continue reading James Reese Europe: America’s Jazz Ambassador

list of names and present duty of men. Duty written as "D.S. Bicycle Corps" for highlighted members

Iron Riders, The 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps, Part IV

This is the final post in a series about the 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps and their missions to test the effectiveness of bicycles for military use. Voyage to St. Louis (final leg), July 16-24, 1897, ~1900 miles (3058 km) For the 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps, the roads across Missouri were bad and hilly, and with … Continue reading Iron Riders, The 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps, Part IV

Cole wearing a nurse hat, dark cape, and nurse uniform

A Woman to Know: Aileen Bertha Stewart

Today's post was written by Holly Rivet, archival technician at the National Archives in St. Louis. Aileen Bertha Stewart, c. 1918 (NAID 2662312) In 1917, the United States formally entered the First World War.  Medical professionals registered for military service and volunteered to meet the needs of wartime healthcare systems.  More than 100 Black doctors … Continue reading A Woman to Know: Aileen Bertha Stewart

circular white label with photo of Black woman with long straightened hair in the center

“No Lye,” the FDA Inspection of G.T. Young, Inc.

Today’s post comes from Zoë A. Zaharakis, a history education undergraduate student at Temple University, with the help of Archivist Grace Schultz. Zoë interned with the National Archives at Philadelphia virtually this fall as a part of the Cultural Fieldwork Initiative (CFI), a partnership with the Temple University College of Education Social Studies faculty and … Continue reading “No Lye,” the FDA Inspection of G.T. Young, Inc.

headshot of Ben Reeves wearing a cowboy hat and collared shirt, front and profile

Love and Death on the Frontier – Finding Ben Reeves at the National Archives

Today's post was written by Holly Rivet, archival technician at the National Archives in St. Louis. Mugshot of Ben Reeves from his Inmate Case File from Leavenworth Penitentiary (NAID 7861497, image 54) In the early afternoon of June 7, 1902, a young Ben Reeves paid a visit to his estranged wife, Castella Brown, at her … Continue reading Love and Death on the Frontier – Finding Ben Reeves at the National Archives

collage of various letterhead

Emmett J. Scott and Community Insights in the OPFs

Today’s post is by Cara Moore Lebonick, Archives Reference Specialist at the National Archives at St. Louis. Personnel records are lauded for their genealogical richness. They typically contain full names, maiden names, birthdates, death dates, next of kin, and even sometimes relevant children’s information, medical data, and photographs. The records offer insight into the working … Continue reading Emmett J. Scott and Community Insights in the OPFs

The Honorable Agitator

Today's post was written by Daniella Furman, archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD Ida Bell Wells-Barnett was born into slavery on July 16, 1862, and freed by the Emancipation Proclamation. She held a career as an educator and later a journalist chronicling the African American experience in the early 1800’s. Her work … Continue reading The Honorable Agitator

2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 2

We have come to a close of the second week of Black History Month 2021. This year, the Say it Loud! Employee Affinity Group is hosting a Black History Basic Training (inspired by GirlTrek campaigns from the past year), where we highlight individuals, organizations and events that made significant contributions to the African American experience. This week, … Continue reading 2021 Black History Basic Training, Week 2

Mustering Out: the Navy’s First Black Yeowomen

Today's post was written by Cara Moore Lebonick, reference archives specialist at the National Archives at St. Louis Disclaimer: Some of the partial records featured contain language that does not reflect modern accepted terminology. Please keep this possible sensitive language in mind when reviewing the records. Orders for Fannie Foote Y3c The United States entered … Continue reading Mustering Out: the Navy’s First Black Yeowomen