Resurrection City: The Continuation of King’s Dream

Today's blog was written by Tina L. Ligon, Supervisory Archivist in Textual Processing at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland The boycotts, protests, and marches of the 1950s and 1960s contributed to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act (1965). These pieces of legislation assisted with the … Continue reading Resurrection City: The Continuation of King’s Dream

Many Thousands Gone: Tribute to Ira Berlin

“[B]inary opposites fit nicely the formulation of history as written, but they do little to capture the mess, inchoate reality of history as live.” ~ Ira Berlin On June 5, 2018, Ira Berlin passed away at age 77, in the Washington, D. C. area. He was an award-winning historian and Distinguished Professor of History at … Continue reading Many Thousands Gone: Tribute to Ira Berlin

Lynching of Women in United States Blog Series: The Lynching of Mrs. Mary Turner and Her Family

This blog was written by Dr. Trichita M. Chestnut, Management and Program Analyst in the Office of the Chief Operating Officer at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland. Lynching remains one of the most disturbing and least understood atrocities in American history. Defining the act of lynching is also controversial and for the purpose … Continue reading Lynching of Women in United States Blog Series: The Lynching of Mrs. Mary Turner and Her Family

Lynching of Women in United States Blog Series: The Lynching of Mrs. Kate Browning

This blog was written by Dr. Trichita M. Chestnut, Management and Program Analyst in the Office of the Chief Operating Officer at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland Lynching remains one of the most disturbing and least understood atrocities in American history. During the Postbellum and Reconstruction periods, mob violence in the south became … Continue reading Lynching of Women in United States Blog Series: The Lynching of Mrs. Kate Browning

The Week of April 4, 1968: A Tribute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Today’s post was written by Steven Booth, Archivist at the Barack Obama Presidential Library in Hoffman Estates, IL This week cities across the United States commemorated the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. who was killed on April 4, 1968. The day prior to his death, Dr. King traveled to … Continue reading The Week of April 4, 1968: A Tribute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

A School Girl Makes History: Tribute to Linda Brown

On March 25, 2018, Linda Brown passed at age 76 (some reports claim 75) in Topeka, Kansas. She was the schoolgirl who was at the center of the 1954 US Supreme Court case, Brown v. Board of Education. At age 9, Brown's father Oliver Brown attempted to enroll her in the all-white Sumner Elementary School … Continue reading A School Girl Makes History: Tribute to Linda Brown

Before the Mayflower: A Tribute to Journalist Lerone Bennett, Jr.

“An educator in a system of oppression is either a revolutionary or an oppressor. ~ Lerone Bennett, Jr. On February 14, 2018, Lerone Bennett, Jr. passed at age 89 at his home in Chicago, Illinois. Bennett was a journalist and social historian who focused on African-American life and racism in the United States. He is … Continue reading Before the Mayflower: A Tribute to Journalist Lerone Bennett, Jr.

A Man of Many “Firsts”

   Today’s post was written by Daniella Furman, Archivist in the Textual Processing Branch at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland      With both Black History month and the 50th anniversary of the 1968 assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. fast approaching, I began looking back to the year of 1968 to … Continue reading A Man of Many “Firsts”

“And They Thought We Couldn’t Fight:”* Remembering the Nine Soldiers in a World War I Photograph

Today’s Blog is written by Barbara Lewis Burger, a retired National Archives Still Picture Senior Archivist The above photograph of nine World War I soldiers of the 369th Infantry Regiment is one of several iconic photographs in the National Archives and Records Administration that document African American soldiers during the war. This particular image has been … Continue reading “And They Thought We Couldn’t Fight:”* Remembering the Nine Soldiers in a World War I Photograph

Living Testimony, Faithful to Cleo & Lifting the Race: Dr. Roland McConnell

                                                 Happy American Archives Month! Today’s blog was written by Dr. Ida E. Jones, University Archivist at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland Professor of history and author Dr. Roland Calhoun McConnell was born in Amherst, Nova Scotia, Canada on March 10, 1910. McConnell graduated from Dunbar High School in 1927, where he was … Continue reading Living Testimony, Faithful to Cleo & Lifting the Race: Dr. Roland McConnell