Fred Hampton: Vanguard Revolutionary

"You can jail a Revolutionary, but you can't jail the Revolution" ~Fred Hampton Fred Hampton was born on August 30, 1948 in Maywood, Illinois. He was gifted in academics and athletics. As a child, he wanted to play for the New York Yankees when he finished school, but ended up studying pre-law at Triton Junior … Continue reading Fred Hampton: Vanguard Revolutionary

Who Is He? A Long-Delayed Search for the Identity of the Airman Portrayed in a World War II Poster

Barbara Lewis Burger, who retired from the Still Picture Branch of the National Archives as a Senior Archivist, wrote today’s blog.  One of her areas of interest is photographic and graphic records of and about African Americans. "Keep us flying! Buy War Bonds." (NAID 514823) Almost 30 years ago I submitted a proposal to National … Continue reading Who Is He? A Long-Delayed Search for the Identity of the Airman Portrayed in a World War II Poster

An Uncensored Digital History of the Black GI in World War II

Today's post is written by Edward J.K. Gitre, Ph.D, Assistant Professor of History at Virginia Tech and Director of The American Soldier in World War II Project. "Colored soldiers is not treated worth a dam [sic] in Louisiana. They don't have no rights and no say-so!... One of us colored soldiers got on the city … Continue reading An Uncensored Digital History of the Black GI in World War II

Tribute to Hall of Famer Frank Robinson

“ I always tried to do the best. I knew I couldn’t always be the best, but I tried to be.” ~Frank Robinson   On February 7, 2019, Hall of Fame baseball player Frank Robinson passed away at the age of 83 in Los Angeles, California. During his career, he had nearly 3,000 hits, .294 … Continue reading Tribute to Hall of Famer Frank Robinson

Early Civil Rights Protest and the Steamer Sue Case

Today's post is written by Dr. Dennis Patrick Halpin, an Assistant Professor at Virginia Tech whose research examines how race, class, and gender shaped the 19th and 20th century urban experience in the United States. He's been conducting research at the National Archives at Philadelphia, focused primarily on the records of the United States District Court … Continue reading Early Civil Rights Protest and the Steamer Sue Case

Remembering Jonestown 40 Years Later

Today’s post was written by Victoria Otero, an Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland. November 18, 2018 marked 40 years since the passing of 918 people in the jungles of Guyana. While debate still exists as to whether or not the event was one of mass suicide or mass murder, the event … Continue reading Remembering Jonestown 40 Years Later

The Gentle Peacemaker: Tribute to Kofi Annan

“Knowledge is power. Information is liberating. Education is the premise of progress, in every society, in every family.” ~Kofi Annan On August 18, 2018, Kofi Annan passed away at the age 80 in Bern, Switzerland. He was the first person from sub-Saharan Africa to lead the United Nations (UN). Under Annan’s leadership, the UN re-established … Continue reading The Gentle Peacemaker: Tribute to Kofi Annan

R-E-S-P-E-C-T: Tribute to the Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin

“You cannot define a person on just one thing. You can’t just forget all these wonderful and good things that a person has done because one thing didn’t come off the way you thought it should come off.” ~Aretha Franklin On August 16, 2018, legendary singer and songwriter Aretha Franklin passed away at the age … Continue reading R-E-S-P-E-C-T: Tribute to the Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin

Tears of America: The Riots of 1968

Today's post was written by Greg Foster, a second year graduate student at Johns Hopkins University, who is a summer intern in the Textual Processing Division at the National Archives at College Park. When I began my summer internship at the National Archives and Records Administration at College Park, Maryland, my first assignment was to … Continue reading Tears of America: The Riots of 1968

Keyes v. School District Number One, Denver, Colorado; Eliminating the “Root and Branch” of School Segregation

Today's post was written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver The stark, black and white Denver Post photograph one finds online is startling; in it two firemen are sweeping broken glass from a window shattered by a pipe bomb while Wilfred Keyes and his wife, just shadows in the dark of … Continue reading Keyes v. School District Number One, Denver, Colorado; Eliminating the “Root and Branch” of School Segregation