front view of 1 story school bldg w/bell on top

Westerly Winds and Big Skies, Finding Colonel Allen Allensworth at the National Archives

Today's post was written by Holly Rivet, archival technician at the National Archives in St. Louis. Allen Allensworth, nd (from findagrave) Allensworth, California was the first city to be established as an African American enclave in California.  It was officially founded on August 3, 1908 by Colonel Allen Allensworth, Chaplain to the 24th Infantry, a … Continue reading Westerly Winds and Big Skies, Finding Colonel Allen Allensworth at the National Archives

man sits in chair while Black medical staff holds a stethescope to chest, Red Cross workers stand in background

“The Responsibility is Placed in Your Hands Entirely” – Red Cross Relief after the Tulsa Race Massacre

Today's post was written by Netisha Currie, archives specialist at the National Archives at College Park. This article also appeared in Social Education vol. 85, no. 1. **Please note some of the images that are linked from this blog are graphic and disturbing, but we include them as  important evidence in the historical record.** Among … Continue reading “The Responsibility is Placed in Your Hands Entirely” – Red Cross Relief after the Tulsa Race Massacre

view of a street w/burned out/destroyed buildings

“Everything was burned down to the ground”: The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

Today’s post was written by Bob Nowatzki, Archives Technician in Research Services at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland. **Please note some of the images are graphic and disturbing, but we include them as  important evidence in the historical record.** The Tulsa Race Massacre of May 31-June 1, 1921 was one of the deadliest … Continue reading “Everything was burned down to the ground”: The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

illustrated bus terminal building

The People v. Jim Crow: Federal Cases that Inspired the Freedom Rides of 1961

Today's post was written by Billy R. Glasco, Jr., archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum. In 1961, the Freedom Riders purposely challenged a system that ignored a series of civil rights cases, ruling segregation of interstate commerce unconstitutional.  The legal battles that inspired the Freedom Rides were fought by a World War … Continue reading The People v. Jim Crow: Federal Cases that Inspired the Freedom Rides of 1961

“An Inspiration Throughout the World”: President Carter Presents Living Legacy Awards

Today's blog post was written by Daria Labinsky, Archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library.  When you work in an archives, you frequently discover amazing events that make you wish for a time machine (and a guest pass). One such event took place at the White House on February 23, 1979, when President Jimmy and … Continue reading “An Inspiration Throughout the World”: President Carter Presents Living Legacy Awards

Two Dead in Mississippi: Remembering the Jackson State Killings of 1970

Today’s blog post was written by Bob Nowatzki and Joshua Schroeder in Research Services at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland “completely unwarranted and unjustified” -President’s Commission on Campus Unrest, 1970 From May 13th to May 15th, 1970, Jackson State College, by then a nearly century-old Historically Black College and University (HBCU), erupted in … Continue reading Two Dead in Mississippi: Remembering the Jackson State Killings of 1970

Fred Hampton: Vanguard Revolutionary

"You can jail a Revolutionary, but you can't jail the Revolution" ~Fred Hampton Fred Hampton was born on August 30, 1948 in Maywood, Illinois. He was gifted in academics and athletics. As a child, he wanted to play for the New York Yankees when he finished school, but ended up studying pre-law at Triton Junior … Continue reading Fred Hampton: Vanguard Revolutionary

The Week of April 4, 1968: A Tribute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Today’s post was written by Steven Booth, Archivist at the Barack Obama Presidential Library in Hoffman Estates, IL This week cities across the United States commemorated the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. who was killed on April 4, 1968. The day prior to his death, Dr. King traveled to … Continue reading The Week of April 4, 1968: A Tribute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Freedom Train and the Contagion of Liberty, 1947-1949

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park Late in 1946, Attorney General Tom Clark, concerned about the direction American life was taking in the wake of World War II, decided something dramatic was needed to increase public awareness of their heritage of freedom and the … Continue reading The Freedom Train and the Contagion of Liberty, 1947-1949

75th Anniversary of the Attack on Pearl Harbor: Dorie Miller, War Hero

Today's blog was written by Dr. Tina L. Ligon, Supervisory Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland At 7:48 am on December 7, 1941, Japanese fighter planes and bombers began their surprise attack on the US Naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. In two waves of attack, the Japanese sunk 4 battleships, … Continue reading 75th Anniversary of the Attack on Pearl Harbor: Dorie Miller, War Hero