Many Thousands Gone: Tribute to Ira Berlin

“[B]inary opposites fit nicely the formulation of history as written, but they do little to capture the mess, inchoate reality of history as live.” ~ Ira Berlin On June 5, 2018, Ira Berlin passed away at age 77, in the Washington, D. C. area. He was an award-winning historian and Distinguished Professor of History at … Continue reading Many Thousands Gone: Tribute to Ira Berlin

A Phenomenon Called “Roots,” 1977

Today’s blog was written by Alan Walker, Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland From the moment our search room doors opened to the public in late 1936, family history was a big draw for the public. For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1938, nearly one quarter of the admission cards issued went to "students … Continue reading A Phenomenon Called “Roots,” 1977

Frederick Douglass – Statesman, Abolitionist, Champion of the People

Today’s post was written by Tiffany Walker, Archivist in the Textual Processing Division at the National Archives at College Park Frederick Douglass was a social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman. After escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in the Northern states and gained a following via … Continue reading Frederick Douglass – Statesman, Abolitionist, Champion of the People

Freedmen’s Bureau Transportation Records: Letters of “Sold” Former Slaves Seeking to Rejoin Loved Ones

Today's blog was written by Mr. Damani Davis, Reference Archivist at the National Archives in Washington, D. C. This blog was a part of a presentation titled "The Freedmen's Bureau and the Freedman's Bank: Reconstruction Records at the National Archives," given at the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) Conference … Continue reading Freedmen’s Bureau Transportation Records: Letters of “Sold” Former Slaves Seeking to Rejoin Loved Ones

Repost ~ ROTW: The Book of Negroes

Submitted by Ms. Netisha Currie, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland This record of the week was a part of a presentation titled "Slavery, Freedmen, and Employment in Government Records,"  given at the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) Conference in Atlanta, Georgia on September 25, … Continue reading Repost ~ ROTW: The Book of Negroes

Record of the Week: The Book of Negroes

This February, the Rediscovering Black History blog is kicking off a new feature - the Record of the Week. Every Thursday during Black History Month there will be a post highlighting one of the records from the National Archives' vast holdings. The Inspection Roll of Negroes (NAID 5890797), more commonly referred to as the Book … Continue reading Record of the Week: The Book of Negroes

Protecting America’s Treasures: Black History in the Vault

Today's blog post is by Netisha Currie, Archives Specialist in the Textual Processing Division of the National Archives     A small portion of the millions of records at the National Archives are considered to be of such historic or intrinsic value that researchers are restricted from physical access to these materials. These materials are … Continue reading Protecting America’s Treasures: Black History in the Vault

eBook celebrates the 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation

Today’s post comes from Stephanie Greenhut, Education Technology Specialist, in the Education and Public Programs division. In the midst of the Civil War, on January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. This document, preserved here at the National Archives, formally proclaimed the freedom of all enslaved people held in areas still in … Continue reading eBook celebrates the 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation