man standing on top of a circular stone structure with the beams for the roof that is about to be completed

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Camp Thunderbird of the Civilian Conservation Corps!

Today's post was written by Holly Rivet, archival technician at the National Archives in St. Louis. The Washington State Park Civilian Conservation Corps Historic District (NAID 63818134) in Washington County, Missouri is protected by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 as of March 4, 1985. This site was home to the Civilian Conservation Corps … Continue reading It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Camp Thunderbird of the Civilian Conservation Corps!

“An Inspiration Throughout the World”: President Carter Presents Living Legacy Awards

Today's blog post was written by Daria Labinsky, Archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library.  When you work in an archives, you frequently discover amazing events that make you wish for a time machine (and a guest pass). One such event took place at the White House on February 23, 1979, when President Jimmy and … Continue reading “An Inspiration Throughout the World”: President Carter Presents Living Legacy Awards

Before Kamala: Black Women in Presidential Administrations

Today's post was written by Billy R. Glasco, Jr., archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum. From the liberating poetry of Phyllis Wheatley to the heroism of Shirley Chisholm. From the fortitude of Ida B. Wells to the tenacity of Fannie Lou Hamer, Stacey Abrams, and other Black women who have fought on the … Continue reading Before Kamala: Black Women in Presidential Administrations

Treating Race at St. Elizabeths Hospital

Today’s post comes from Ben Miller, an intern with the Exhibits team at the National Archives Museum. On August 31, 1852, Congress appropriated $100,000 to create the government hospital for the insane in Washington, DC. Soon known as St. Elizabeths, the hospital was meant to be a “model institution,” providing the highest quality mental health … Continue reading Treating Race at St. Elizabeths Hospital

Portal Spotlight: World War I

In 1917, when the United States declared war on Germany and entered the Great War, African Americans were supportive. The patriotic spirit of the era encouraged Black men and women to enlist in the military, in order to fight for freedom and democracy. Although their patriotism was just as great as their white American counterparts, … Continue reading Portal Spotlight: World War I

Dr. George Edmund Haynes: Social Crusader in Black Economics

Today's post was written by Gabrielle Hutchins, Ph.D, an archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD George Edmund Haynes Dr. George Edmund Haynes is one of many remarkable figures in the history of the African American labor movement.  During the 1920s, Dr. Haynes truthfully captured Black laborers' stories as he traveled throughout the … Continue reading Dr. George Edmund Haynes: Social Crusader in Black Economics

Historical Background of the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program

Today’s post was written by Gabrielle Downer, Ph.D. Archivist in the Textual Processing Division at the National Archives at College Park Historically, the agricultural industry has been generally unable to meet the labor demands since the 1940s. During World War II, the United States suffered drastically from food and labor shortages. Farm workers joined the … Continue reading Historical Background of the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program

Black History Month 2017: Blogs Related to the Panama Canal

Happy Black History Month! This year the Rediscovering Black History blog at the National Archives would like to highlight select posts from the past. This public blog was created to inform researchers, scholars, students, and anyone interested in records related to African-American history at the National Archives and Presidential Libraries on the vast amount of … Continue reading Black History Month 2017: Blogs Related to the Panama Canal

W. E. B. Du Bois, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the Study of Black Life

Today’s blog was written by Mary Kate Eckles, summer intern at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland and a liberal arts student at St. John’s College W. E. B. Du Bois (1868-1963) was one of the leading academics on black life in the United States. He was a historian, sociologist, educator and the first … Continue reading W. E. B. Du Bois, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the Study of Black Life

Accidents, Injuries and Deaths in the Canal Zone, 1884–1999

Written by Patrice Brown, Archivist (Special Assistant) in the Evaluation and Special Projects Division, National Declassification Center at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland This is the second in a series of blogs that relates to Panama Canal records. This blog focuses on death records and how the records can be used to perform … Continue reading Accidents, Injuries and Deaths in the Canal Zone, 1884–1999