list of names and present duty of men. Duty written as "D.S. Bicycle Corps" for highlighted members

Iron Riders, The 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps, Part IV

This is the final post in a series about the 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps and their missions to test the effectiveness of bicycles for military use. Voyage to St. Louis (final leg), July 16-24, 1897, ~1900 miles (3058 km) For the 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps, the roads across Missouri were bad and hilly, and with … Continue reading Iron Riders, The 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps, Part IV

white doctor administers injection to a participant wearing a blue shirt w/sleeve rolled up looking at his arm

A Long Overdue Apology

“To the survivors, to the wives and family members, the children and the grandchildren, I say what you know: No power on Earth can give you back the lives lost, the pain suffered, the years of internal torment and anguish. What was done cannot be undone. But we can end the silence. We can stop … Continue reading A Long Overdue Apology

bicycle corps members on a main street in town, one leans on his bike looking into the camera, others stand in background. bikes are packed with frame and handlebar gear, rifles slung on backs

Iron Riders, The 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps, Part III

This is the third post in a series about the 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps and their missions to test the effectiveness of bicycles for military use. As noted previously, the Secretary of War on May 4 approved the long distance bicycle trip by the 25th Infantry Regiment. The following day, May 5, General Miles left Washington, … Continue reading Iron Riders, The 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps, Part III

view of fog covered mountains

Iron Riders, The 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps, Part II

This is the second post in a series about the 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps and their missions to test the effectiveness of bicycles for military use. In July 1896, Moss organized at Fort Missoula, from Companies B, F, and H, a bicycle corps to thoroughly test the practicability of the bicycle for military purposes … Continue reading Iron Riders, The 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps, Part II

Experiencing Black Joy through Federal Records

Joy is defined as an emotion of great delight or happiness that is often caused by a positive or an extraordinary experience. Joy can be good for one’s health and wellness. Scientists and psychologists have studied the effects of joy on people, and determined that joy can prevent stress, improve heart health, reduce pain, and … Continue reading Experiencing Black Joy through Federal Records

group of men in uniforms walking through field w/bicycles. Rifles on back, and bikes are packed with bags

Iron Riders – The 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps, Part I

This is the first post in a series about the 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps and their missions to test the effectiveness of bicycles for military use. On November 3, 1917 United States Army Colonel James Alfred Moss, at Camp Upton, New York, took command of the newly organized 367th Infantry Regiment, a unit of … Continue reading Iron Riders – The 25th Infantry Regiment Bicycle Corps, Part I

Cole wearing a nurse hat, dark cape, and nurse uniform

A Woman to Know: Aileen Bertha Stewart

Today's post was written by Holly Rivet, archival technician at the National Archives in St. Louis. Aileen Bertha Stewart, c. 1918 (NAID 2662312) In 1917, the United States formally entered the First World War.  Medical professionals registered for military service and volunteered to meet the needs of wartime healthcare systems.  More than 100 Black doctors … Continue reading A Woman to Know: Aileen Bertha Stewart

Morton and President Carter shaking hands and smiling

Azie Taylor Morton: The One and Only

Since the dissolvement of the Freedman’s Bank, the peculiar history of financial institutions and the African American community has been woven into America’s cultural fabric.  This is why the appointment of Azie Taylor Morton to President Jimmy Carter’s administration was, and still is revolutionary.  On September 12,1977, President Carter appointed Azie Taylor Morton Treasurer of … Continue reading Azie Taylor Morton: The One and Only

circular white label with photo of Black woman with long straightened hair in the center

“No Lye,” the FDA Inspection of G.T. Young, Inc.

Today’s post comes from Zoë A. Zaharakis, a history education undergraduate student at Temple University, with the help of Archivist Grace Schultz. Zoë interned with the National Archives at Philadelphia virtually this fall as a part of the Cultural Fieldwork Initiative (CFI), a partnership with the Temple University College of Education Social Studies faculty and … Continue reading “No Lye,” the FDA Inspection of G.T. Young, Inc.

“Lift Every Voice”: A Tribute to Lani Guinier

“As a country, we are in a state of denial about issues of race and racism. And too many of our leaders have concluded that the way to remedy racism is to simply stop talking about race.” ~Lani Guinier Lani Guinier, 1993 (flickr) On January 7, 2022, attorney, law professor, and author Lani Guinier passed … Continue reading “Lift Every Voice”: A Tribute to Lani Guinier