Record of the Week: Black British POWs

Today's Record was submitted by Jesse Wilinski, Archives Technician at the National Archives in Washington, D. C. In the series Registers of British Prisoners of War, 1812-1815 (NAID 1807650) in RG 45 Naval Records Collection of the Office of Naval Records and Library, are several volumes related to British Prisoners of War (POWs) captured during … Continue reading Record of the Week: Black British POWs

Pictorial History of Black Women in the US Navy during World War II and Beyond

Today's blog was written by Dr. Tina L. Ligon, Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland Most of the records that are held at the National Archives related to women in the US Navy, primarily focused on their involvement as WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service). The few selected series contains photographs, … Continue reading Pictorial History of Black Women in the US Navy during World War II and Beyond

Firefly Project and the 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion (“Smoke Jumpers”)

Today's post was written by Dr. Greg Bradsher and Dr. Sylvia Naylor, archivists at the National Archives in College Park. In April 1945 the 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion received orders to move to the West Coast for a special assignment.  Members of this all African American unit hoped to finally see combat during World War II in the … Continue reading Firefly Project and the 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion (“Smoke Jumpers”)

Captain Frederick C. Branch: The First African American Commissioned Officer in the USMC

Written by Kevin L. Bradley, Archives Technician in the Motion Picture, Sound, and Video Division at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland The National Archives holds thousands of photographs illustrating the various activities of servicemen and women in all branches of the Armed Forces. The photographs are able to give visuals of the bravery and … Continue reading Captain Frederick C. Branch: The First African American Commissioned Officer in the USMC

“Remember Fort Pillow”: The 150th Anniversary of the Fort Pillow Massacre

Today’s blog is written by Dr. Trichita M. Chestnut, Deputy Director Production Division of Data Processing at the National Declassification Center (NWD) at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland “…the black men who were killed at Fort Pillow...and elsewhere, fighting as gallantly and as bravely as any men under the flag, be their complexion … Continue reading “Remember Fort Pillow”: The 150th Anniversary of the Fort Pillow Massacre

The Significance of Motion Picture Footage Housed at the National Archives and Records Administration Relating to the African American Soldier

Today's blog was written by Donald Roe, Associate Professor of History, Howard University, and former Archivist and Subject Area Expert in the Motion Picture Sound and Video Branch at NARA   The film collection housed at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), consisting of both edited and unedited film footage, is among the largest … Continue reading The Significance of Motion Picture Footage Housed at the National Archives and Records Administration Relating to the African American Soldier