Andrew Young: A Giant Among Us

Today’s post was written by Billy R. Glasco, Jr., archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum. March 12, 2021 marked the 89th birthday of a leader that serves as a gatekeeper to our understanding of the most preeminent era in Black History. A pastor who spread the practice of non-violence in the rural … Continue reading Andrew Young: A Giant Among Us

Civil Rights Activist and Political Advisor: Tribute to Vernon Jordan

“I’m here because I stand on many, many shoulders, and that’s true of every black person I know who has achieved.” ~Vernon Jordan On March 1, 2021, civil rights activist, businessman and presidential advisor, Vernon Jordan passed away at the age of 85, in Washington, DC. He dedicated his life to promoting voting rights, economic … Continue reading Civil Rights Activist and Political Advisor: Tribute to Vernon Jordan

Selma: The Marches that Changed America

Today’s post was written by Billy R. Glasco, Jr., archivist at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library & Museum The Selma Marches were a series of three marches that took place in 1965 between Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. These marches were organized to protest the blocking of Black Americans’ right to vote by the systematic racist structure of … Continue reading Selma: The Marches that Changed America

Gwen Ifill, “A Journalist’s Journalist”

Today’s Tribute was written by Dr. Tina L. Ligon, Supervisory Archivist at the National Archives at College Park “Journalists are accused of being lapdogs when they don’t ask the hard questions, but then accused of being rude when they do. Good thing we have tough hides.” ~ Gwen Ifill On November 14, 2016, Gwen Ifill … Continue reading Gwen Ifill, “A Journalist’s Journalist”

Amelia Boynton Robinson, Leader in the Voting Rights Movement

Today’s Tribute was written by Dr. Tina L. Ligon, Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland “It’s important that young people know about the struggles we faced to get to the point we are today. Only then will they appreciate the hard-won freedom of blacks in this country.” ~ Amelia Boynton Robinson On … Continue reading Amelia Boynton Robinson, Leader in the Voting Rights Movement

Striving Towards the Great Society: Remembering LBJ, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Momentous Year that Encompassed It

Written by Dr. Miranda Booker Perry, Archivist at the National Archives at Washington, D. C. LBJ and Civil Rights Although I did not have the opportunity to attend the Civil Rights Summit in April of this year, having the event at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library was most fitting. A key component of the … Continue reading Striving Towards the Great Society: Remembering LBJ, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Momentous Year that Encompassed It

Three Civil Rights Workers

Today’s blog was written by Damon Turner, summer intern at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland and doctoral student at Morgan State University Freedom Summer or the Mississippi Summer Project was a time of great intrigue and courage.  Black and White Americans who witnessed the horrors of Jim Crow, attempted to change America for … Continue reading Three Civil Rights Workers

After the Civil Rights Act, Now What?

Today’s blog was written by Dr. Tina L. Ligon, Archivist at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland The passage of the Civil Rights in 1964 gave African Americans hope for equality in America.  The act allowed for the Department of Justice (DOJ) to initiate lawsuits on behalf of individuals who were discriminated against on … Continue reading After the Civil Rights Act, Now What?