Keyes v. School District Number One, Denver, Colorado; Eliminating the “Root and Branch” of School Segregation

Today's post was written by Cody White, Archivist at the National Archives at Denver The stark, black and white Denver Post photograph one finds online is startling; in it two firemen are sweeping broken glass from a window shattered by a pipe bomb while Wilfred Keyes and his wife, just shadows in the dark of … Continue reading Keyes v. School District Number One, Denver, Colorado; Eliminating the “Root and Branch” of School Segregation

Lynching of Women in United States Blog Series: The Lynching of Mrs. Kate Browning

This blog was written by Dr. Trichita M. Chestnut, Management and Program Analyst in the Office of the Chief Operating Officer at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland Lynching remains one of the most disturbing and least understood atrocities in American history. During the Postbellum and Reconstruction periods, mob violence in the south became … Continue reading Lynching of Women in United States Blog Series: The Lynching of Mrs. Kate Browning

“And They Thought We Couldn’t Fight:”* Remembering the Nine Soldiers in a World War I Photograph

Today’s Blog is written by Barbara Lewis Burger, a retired National Archives Still Picture Senior Archivist The above photograph of nine World War I soldiers of the 369th Infantry Regiment is one of several iconic photographs in the National Archives and Records Administration that document African American soldiers during the war. This particular image has been … Continue reading “And They Thought We Couldn’t Fight:”* Remembering the Nine Soldiers in a World War I Photograph

The Freedom Train and the Contagion of Liberty, 1947-1949

Today’s post is written by Dr. Greg Bradsher, Senior Archivist at the National Archives at College Park Late in 1946, Attorney General Tom Clark, concerned about the direction American life was taking in the wake of World War II, decided something dramatic was needed to increase public awareness of their heritage of freedom and the … Continue reading The Freedom Train and the Contagion of Liberty, 1947-1949

Dick Gregory, Civil Rights Activist and Comedic Legend

Richard Claxton “Dick” Gregory was born in St. Louis, Missouri on October 12, 1932. He attended Southern Illinois University Carbondale, until he was drafted into the United States Army. Gregory is notably recognized for his work during the 1960s where he became a forerunner in stand-up comedy and a political activist. He was the first … Continue reading Dick Gregory, Civil Rights Activist and Comedic Legend

Thanks, Obama

Today's post was written by Netisha Currie, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at College Park. Barack Hussein Obama was elected the 44th President of the United States on November 4, 2008. By winning nearly 53% of the popular vote in an election that brought the highest voter turnout until the most recent election of … Continue reading Thanks, Obama

An Act to Establish the National Museum of African American History and Culture

Today's post is by Netisha Currie, Archives Specialist at the National Archives in College Park, MD. Throughout this month until November 9th the National Archives will display the act from 2003 that established the National Museum for African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), opening this weekend on September 24th. The Pieces of History blog wrote a … Continue reading An Act to Establish the National Museum of African American History and Culture

Bayard Rustin: The Inmate that the Prison Could Not Handle

Today's post was written by Shaina Destine, a student intern in Textual Processing at the National Archives in College Park. Bayard Rustin was the perpetual hero that history forgot.  I learned of Bayard Rustin in regards to his Civil Rights and Gay Rights work in my early 20s.  I heard about him being a Quaker … Continue reading Bayard Rustin: The Inmate that the Prison Could Not Handle

To Boldly Go Where No (Wo)Man Has Gone Before…

Today's post was written by Ms. Netisha Currie, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland "Space, the final frontier..." these are the words recited at the beginning of every episode of the national treasure that is Star Trek: The Original Series. Widely known to be an inspiration to geeks, nerds, sci-fi buffs and … Continue reading To Boldly Go Where No (Wo)Man Has Gone Before…

Jesse Owens, American Hero

Today's post was written by Netisha Currie, Archives Specialist at the National Archives in College Park The new biographical movie about Jesse Owens, Race, will be released in theaters this Friday, February 19th. The title has a double meaning - alluding to Owens' historic record breaking feats he performed at the 1936 Berlin Olympics as well … Continue reading Jesse Owens, American Hero