Dr. George Edmund Haynes: Social Crusader in Black Economics

Today's post was written by Gabrielle Hutchins, Ph.D, an archivist at the National Archives in College Park, MD George Edmund Haynes Dr. George Edmund Haynes is one of many remarkable figures in the history of the African American labor movement.  During the 1920s, Dr. Haynes truthfully captured Black laborers' stories as he traveled throughout the … Continue reading Dr. George Edmund Haynes: Social Crusader in Black Economics

William Dorsey Swann, the Queen of Drag

Today's post was written by Netisha Currie, archives specialist at the National Archives in College Park, MD. The wonderful thing about the massive amounts of paper that the National Archives has is that there will always be another story to uncover. At the beginning of this year, I came across the article “The First Drag … Continue reading William Dorsey Swann, the Queen of Drag

Slaves in the Family and Escape on the Pearl: A Report on Two Books that Used NARA Records

Today's post was written by Damani Davis, an Archivist at the National Archives in Washington, DC. Among the most tangible products validating the work of National Archives' (NARA) reference staff are the books written by the many researchers we’ve assisted over the years. Often, there can be a type of synergistic or mutually beneficial relationship … Continue reading Slaves in the Family and Escape on the Pearl: A Report on Two Books that Used NARA Records

Portal Spotlight: Civil Unrest and the Red Summer

Today's post was written by Bob Nowatzki, Archives Technician in Research Services at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland. The early 20th century witnessed the migration of hundreds of thousands of African Americans from the South to the Northeast, Midwest, and West. One of the main causes for this mass migration was the continuing … Continue reading Portal Spotlight: Civil Unrest and the Red Summer

Two Dead in Mississippi: Remembering the Jackson State Killings of 1970

Today’s blog post was written by Bob Nowatzki and Joshua Schroeder in Research Services at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland “completely unwarranted and unjustified” -President’s Commission on Campus Unrest, 1970 From May 13th to May 15th, 1970, Jackson State College, by then a nearly century-old Historically Black College and University (HBCU), erupted in … Continue reading Two Dead in Mississippi: Remembering the Jackson State Killings of 1970

The Maker of Pilots: Aviator and Civil Rights Activist Willa Beatrice Brown

Today's post was written by Jennifer Johnson, curator for the National Archives Traveling Exhibits Service at the National Archives in Kansas City. This blog previously appeared on Pieces of History. Willa Beatrice Brown is featured in the nationwide traveling exhibit One Half of the People: Advancing Equality for Women. Perhaps one of the less recognizable names, but … Continue reading The Maker of Pilots: Aviator and Civil Rights Activist Willa Beatrice Brown

An Uncensored Digital History of the Black GI in World War II

Today's post is written by Edward J.K. Gitre, Ph.D, Assistant Professor of History at Virginia Tech and Director of The American Soldier in World War II Project. "Colored soldiers is not treated worth a dam [sic] in Louisiana. They don't have no rights and no say-so!... One of us colored soldiers got on the city … Continue reading An Uncensored Digital History of the Black GI in World War II

Early Civil Rights Protest and the Steamer Sue Case

Today's post is written by Dr. Dennis Patrick Halpin, an Assistant Professor at Virginia Tech whose research examines how race, class, and gender shaped the 19th and 20th century urban experience in the United States. He's been conducting research at the National Archives at Philadelphia, focused primarily on the records of the United States District Court … Continue reading Early Civil Rights Protest and the Steamer Sue Case

Remembering Jonestown 40 Years Later

Today’s post was written by Victoria Otero, an Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland. November 18, 2018 marked 40 years since the passing of 918 people in the jungles of Guyana. While debate still exists as to whether or not the event was one of mass suicide or mass murder, the event … Continue reading Remembering Jonestown 40 Years Later

Tears of America: The Riots of 1968

Today's post was written by Greg Foster, a second year graduate student at Johns Hopkins University, who is a summer intern in the Textual Processing Division at the National Archives at College Park. When I began my summer internship at the National Archives and Records Administration at College Park, Maryland, my first assignment was to … Continue reading Tears of America: The Riots of 1968